Current Undergraduate Courses

Italian Studies Undergraduate Course Offerings - 2020-21 Academic Year

Click to view courses according to their level.

For full details of any of the courses listed below, please select the course code.

ITA100Y1 - Italian Language for Beginners

An introduction to the main elements of the Italian language. The development of speaking, reading, listening, and writing skills. Introduction to Italian culture and texts.

  • When: Year-long course with multiple meeting sections available spanning throughout the week (Mondays to Fridays) with morning, afternoon, and evening offerings.
  • Instructor: Taught by 11 – 16 instructors.

ITA197H1SThe Fine Art of Murder: Reading Detective

Since its inception in the nineteenth-century, detective fiction has been one of the most popular literary genres, proving adept at both entertaining and shining a critical light on social and political problems. This course will explore the many faces of detective fiction addressing questions such as: Why does crime hold such a fascination for modern audiences? What kind of pleasure do we derive from reading stories that often follow established conventions and rules? What do these novels about crime and punishment tell us about broader social and political issues?

  • When: S semester – Thursdays at 10am
  • Instructor: Stefano Serafini

ITA198H1F & ITA198H1S - Machiavelli and Machiavellianism

An examination of Machiavelli’s political doctrine in The Prince and the development of his ideas in politics, ethics, and the arts. Special attention will be paid to the enduring relevance of his legacy in the modern world.

  • When: F semester – Thursdays at 10am | S semester – Tuesdays at 2pm
  • Instructor: Manuela Scarci (for S semester – ITA198H1S)

ITA199H1F - Italian Fascism and Global Responses: The Dark Side of Italianità

After World War I, Italian society faced a political, economic, and moral crisis that resulted in the rise of fascism. Using diverse sources (media, literary texts, movies, architecture, and design), this course explores various reactions in Italy and abroad to the rise of Mussolini and the totalitarian State. Why did common people, intellectuals, politicians, and business and community leaders around the globe succumb to the seduction of fascism? How did other people denounce fascist violence? After an introduction to Italian fascism, the course will consider global reactions to Italian fascism and diverse responses in Italian communities abroad (e.g. Canada, USA, Argentina).

  • When: F semester – Tuesdays at 2pm
  • Instructor: Andrea Lanza

ITA200H1F - Major Italian Authors in Translation: from Dante to Tasso

The course will focus on authors from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance who had a defining influence on Western literature, such as Dante, Petrarca, Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Ariosto, and Tasso. This course includes a component designed to enhance students’ research experience. (Given in English)

  • When: F semester - Thursdays at 12pm
  • Instructor: TBC by dept.

ITA201H1SMajor Italian Authors in Translation: from Marino to Calvino

The course will focus on authors from the Baroque to the Twentieth Century who had a defining influence on Western literature, such as Marino, Goldoni, Manzoni, Pirandello, Calvino. This course includes a component designed to enhance students’ research experience. (Given in English)

  • When: S semester - Thursdays at 12pm.
  • Instructor: Eloisa Morra

ITA233H1FItalian-Canadian Literature

The course will explore how notions of identity and (self)-representation emerge in literature by Canadian writers of Italian descent, illustrating the critical evolution of the immigrant journey from its historical experience to its current condition. This course includes a component designed to enhance students’ research experience. (Given in English)

  • When: F semester - Thursdays at 2pm
  • Instructor: TBC by dept.

ITA250Y1Intermediate Italian

Grammar review, readings of Italian authors and oral practice to enhance comprehension and expressive skills.

  • When: Year-long course with multiple meeting sections available offered on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, in the afternoons and evenings.
  • Instructor: Eloisa Morra & TBC by dept.

JCI250H1 – Italian Canadian Communities

This course examines the past and present settlement patterns of those of Italian descent in Canada, in rural areas and cities, including increasing suburbanization.  Students will address issues such as work and employment and political participation.  Challenges and opportunities will be examined, with respect to issues such as migration, community-building, belonging, and discrimination.

  • When: Not offered in 2020-2021
  • Instructor: TBC by dept.

ITA320H1F - Dante: Vita Nuova and Divina Commedia (Inferno)

Dante's poetry and great Christian epic of conversion explode with the passions of this world. This course focuses on intertextual and rhetorical strategies used to fashion the author's complex vision of contemporary society within the framework of providential history. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

  • When: F semester - Tuesdays at 12pm
  • Instructor: Elisa Brilli

ITA321H1SDante: Divina Commedia (Purgatorio and Paradiso)

A continuation of ITA320H1, this course examines the Purgatorio and the Paradiso in the context of Dante's vision of contemporary society. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

  • When: S semester - Tuesdays at 12pm
  • Instructor: Elisa Brilli

ITA332H1SLove in the Renaissance

An exploration of the theme of love in the Renaissance and its development in a variety of literary forms. Analysis of treatises, poetry, short stories and letters with the purpose of examining intertextuality and the practice of imitation, as well as the social and political aspects of love, such as marriage, women's position in society, pornography, homosexuality and other issues. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience. (Given in English)

  • When: S semester – Thursdays at 2pm
  • Instructor: Fabien Lacouture

ITA345H1SCinema of the Italian Diasporas: Italian Americans in Hollywood

Italian-Americans have a long and varied history in the cinematic traditions of Hollywood. Hollywood’s fascination with Italian mobsters and other cultural stereotypes surrounding Italian-Americans have given rise to some of the most significant films in American popular culture including: The Godfather Trilogy, Goodfellas, Big Night, Moonstruck, and Do the Right Thing. This course examines the history of Italian-Americans in Hollywood and focus on how diasporic directors, actors, and communities have grappled with their representation in Hollywood cinema. We will engage with film theory as well as a body of work on racial and cultural stereotypes. Students will also pay close attention to the socio-cultural context in which each film screened was produced and distributed, allowing them to situate these cultural artifacts within broader histories of Italian diasporas.

  • When: S semester - Thursdays at 3 pm.
  • Instructor: TBA

ITA350YLanguage Practice

For students who have completed ITA250Y1 / ITA251Y1. Discussion of problems of grammar, style, and composition. Language analysis based on readings of Italian authors. One hour a week of oral practice. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

  • When: Year-long course offered on Mondays and Wednesdays at 6pm
  • Instructor: Eloisa Morra & TBC by dept.

ITA363H1Italian Sociolinguistics

Starting with a survey of the sociolinguistic situation in Italy before Unification, this course deals with the complex relationship between regional languages and dialects on the one hand and Common Italian on the other. The recent rise of regional variants of Italian and its impact on the dialects are also discussed. This course includes a component designed to enhance students’ research experience.

ITA380H1The Prose of the World: The Modern Italian Novel and the Realist Tradition

This course examines the development of modern Italian novel by taking as its focus the question of the relationship between narrative and the world. The course analyzes some of the major figures of Nineteenth-Century realist tradition such as Manzoni and Verga, as well as the resurgence of realist narrative in the post-World War II period with authors such as Pavese and Calvino. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience. (Given in English)

  • When: F semester - Tuesdays at 3pm
  • Instructor: Luca Somigli

JCI350H1 – Italian Canadian Culture and Identity

This course examines the contributions of Canadians of Italian descent to arts, culture, identity and heritage in Canada, with attention to the diversity of the community with respect to issues such as language, religion, gender, class, sexuality, etc. A core concept addressed by the course is immigration, whether from the experiences of migrants themselves or later generations.

  • When: S Semester - Wednesdays at 3pm.
  • Instructor: Paolo Frascà

ITA425H1F - 100 Years of Federico Fellini

In the centenary of Federico Fellini’s birth, this graduate seminar will examine the Italian filmmaker’s oeuvre in relation to questions of authorship, autobiography, and autofiction, evaluating his legacy through historical, cultural, political, social, and aesthetic lens. The goal is not to unproblematically celebrate his achievements, but rather to think “through” Fellini about synchronous and asynchronous theoretical debates, and to examine the viability of monographic courses as a pedagogical model in 21st century film studies. The assigned readings will bring complexity, relevance, and nuance to this attempt to interrogate, rather than just demolish, the “old master” paradigm. This course is part of a year-long research project on Federico Fellini that includes a fall retrospective at TIFF and an international conference in Toronto (October 16-17). For details, visit the conference website.

  • When: F semester – Fridays at 2pm (synchronous) with an additional 3 hours of screening (asynchronous online)
  • Instructor: Alberto Zambenedetti

Fine print: • Class given in English • Prerequisite - completion of at least 4.0 FCEs

ITA426H1SPirandello

The cultural and theoretical issues that constitute the foundation of Luigi Pirandello’s essay on humor will provide the background against which several of his novels, short stories and/or plays will be discussed. Narrative and dramatic texts are intertwined in the dialogic history of Pirandello’s overturning of traditional XIX century narrative and dramatic strategies. During the seminar, students will be engaged in the investigation of the complex trajectory travelled by Luigi Pirandello in his remapping of both genres (i.e.. narrative and drama) in the Western tradition.

  • When: S semester - Tuesdays at 3pm
  • Instructor: Luca Somigli

Fine print: Prerequisite – ITA250Y1 / ITA251Y1 / ITA252Y1 and completion of at least 4.0 FCEs

 

ITA433H1Italian Language and Italian Dialects in Toronto

Through an historical overview of Italian immigration in Toronto, the role of Italian and Italian dialects in the city will be examined. As part of the topic studied in course, students will contribute to the website of the OIM by collecting varied forms of empirical linguistic evidence.