Current Graduate Courses

2024-25 Course Offerings

ITA1000H (Fall/Winter biweekly) - Methodologies for the Teaching and Study of Italian / L. Somigli

Students are introduced to basic reference materials necessary for research and will familiarize themselves with the Reference, Periodical Rooms, and the Thomas Fisher Rare Books Library. They will also study philological, computer-assisted and critical methods for the study of Italian literature and linguistics.

ITA1030H (Fall) - Italian Lexicography: History and Methodologies / F. Pierno

This seminar will consist in a historical overview of Italian lexicography, from Medieval glossaries to online or cd-rom dictionaries. The aims of the course are the following: A) identifying the principal research instruments, and their appropriate use; B) analyzing the methodological issues in Italian Lexicography, also in comparison with other lexicographical traditions; C) understanding the ideological situations which provoked changes and evolutions in Italian Lexicography. In order to study in depth the principal research instruments (point A), the students will work under the guide of the teacher in the library and in the computer laboratory. For a better comprehension of theoretical and historical methodologies (point B), the students engage in an individual research project focusing on a particular lexicographical question.

ITA 1540H/425H1S (Winter) Renaissance Italian TheatreL. Ingallinella

This course explores drama and performance culture in Renaissance Italy (1350-1650). Students explore a variety of dramaturgical genres (e.g., comedy, tragedy, pastoral drama, and commedia dell’arte) to answer this question: How did Renaissance Italians represent, question, and subvert issues related to identity and difference on stage? Assigned readings feature works by Niccolò Machiavelli, Isabella Andreini, and Pietro Aretino, and class discussion will focus on topics such as the history of gender and sexuality, social class, ethnicity and race, disability, and aging.

ITA1737H/ITA426H1F (Fall) Reading Black Italy: Decolonizing the Canon / A. Pesarini

This course will explore texts of different genres produced by Italian authors of African descent including novels, essays, poetry, slam poetry, short stories, autobiographical writing. Topics will include issues of race, gender, identity, racism and anti-racism, colonialism, coming to age experiences, agency, and resistance. This course will follow the principles of a reading group in which students will have the opportunity to take part in collective readings, using the Italian original texts or the English translation, with further socio-cultural context provided in class. Students will be asked to lead class conversations, presentations and text analysis. On occasion, some of the authors will join the class and engage in Q&A and conversations. During the course, students will also be invited to explore forms of autobiographical/creative/fiction writing as forms of assignment.

ITA1820H/425H1F (Fall) The Mediterranean Noir: A Transnational Approach / A. Zambenedetti

Through the exploration of a variety of literary and cinematic works this course will grapple with questions arising from the repositioning of film noir in a transnational and global context. We will study films from Mediterranean cinemas (primarily Italian, French, and Spanish) understanding the permeability of noir to ideas and styles from many cultures. Ultimately, this course traces an alternative history of noir, one that engages with dark shadows and rainy North American cityscapes as well as with the sunny landscapes and blue hues of the Mediterranean basin.

ITA 1830H/426H1S (Winter) Editing 900: Leonardo Sciascia, his World, his Archive / E. Morra

This course aims to explore the work of Leonardo Sciascia (1921-1989), among the most notable authors of 20th-century Italian literature, by intertwining literary studies and digital humanities. The theoretical component of the course will place Sciascia's oeuvre into its cultural context (from the crisis of the Christian Democracy to the Moro case, the Years of Lead and Sicilian Mafia), exploring the genesis of his books and Sciascia’s experiments with different literary genres. Moreover, it will include hands-on modules (including some online lectures by guest experts) on digital archives and scholarly editing, enabling students to experience the physical archive and learn the methods of "authorial philology”, i.e. scholarly editing of twentieth century authors. By exploring the unique resources offered by the Sciascia Archive Project, an archive preserved in the Department of Italian Studies, students will reflect on Sciascia’s reception in the Italian and North-American context.

MST 5003H (Winter) Topics in Medieval Languages and Literatures / E. Brilli

Course description to be announced. 

2024-2025 Timetable

Fall Term (September 2024 - December 2024)

~ All times stated in Eastern Time. ~

Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
10 am-12 pm

ITA 1820H / ITA425H1F

The Mediterranean Noir: A Transnational Approach**

(Zambenedetti)

RL 3-023

ITA 1030H

Italian Lexicography: History and Methodologies

(Pierno)

CR 107

 

 

 
12 pm-2 pm

ITA 1820H / ITA425H1F

The Mediterranean Noir: A Transnational Approach** (Zambenedetti)

RL 3-023

       
2 pm-4 pm  

ITA 1737H / ITA426H1F

Reading Black Italy: Decolonizing the Canon 

(Pesarini

ITA 1000H 

Methodologies for the Teaching and Study of Italian - Biweekly

(Chair, Somigli

CR 107

 

 

 

4 pm-6 pm       Goggio Lecture to be announced.  

 

Winter Term (January 2025 - April 2025)

~ All times stated in Eastern Time. ~

Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
10 am-12 pm  

ITA 1540H / ITA425H1S

Renaissance Italian Theatre

(Ingallinella

     
12 pm-2 pm          
2 pm-4 pm

MST 5003H 

Topics in Medeival Languages and Literatures*

(Brilli

ITA 1830H / ITA426H1S

Editing 900: Leonardo Sciascia, his World, his Archive

(Morra

ITA 1000H 

Methodologies for the Teaching and Study of Italian - Biweekly

(Chair, Somigli

CR 107

 

 

4 pm-6 pm       Goggio Lecture to be announced.  

* in collaboration with the Centre for Medieval Studies (https://www.medieval.utoronto.ca)

** in collaboration with the Cinema Studies Institute (www.cinema.utoronto.ca)